Your Guide to the GAA on TV this Weekend

With a busy weekend of sport ahead, we’ve got you covered with this guide for all the GAA on TV this weekend.

We love our GAA at Intersport Elverys and this guide has all the details of this weekend’s GAA fixtures.

We’ve got all the bases covered.

 

GAA on TV this Weekend: Saturday, May 25 2024

GAA Football All-Ireland Senior Championship

Dublin v Roscommon at 5pm on GAAGO
in Croke Park

Louth v Meath at 5.30pm
in Inniskeen

Armagh v Westmeath at 6pm
in Athletic Grounds Armagh

Donegal v Tyrone at 7.15pm on GAA
in Ballybofey

GAA on TV this Weekend: Saturday, May 25 2024

Leinster GAA Hurling Senior Championship

Kilkenny v Wexford at 2pm on GAAGO
in Nowlan Park

Galway v Dublin at 2pm on RTÉ Sport
in Pearse Stadium

Antrim v Carlow at 2pm
in Corrigan Park, Belfast

Munster GAA Hurling Senior Championship

Tipperary v Clare at 4pm
in Semple Stadium

Limerick v Waterford at 4pm on RTÉ Sport
in TUS Gaelic Grounds

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

gaa on tv this weekend


Best GAA Players of All time: Ultimate Football XV 2000-2020

Over the past 20 years we’ve been graced with some of the best GAA players of all time lining out for their counties.

We’ve seen Dublin become the greatest team ever, Mayo’s continual All-Ireland heartbreak, the great Tyrone/Armagh rivalry of the Noughties, some Kerry magic and much more.

We love our GAA at Intersport Elverys, so we’ve tasked ourselves with the unenviable task of picking the best GAA players of all time for our ultimate football XV.

It wasn’t easy and we had to make some difficult decisions for who gets the start.

We know we’ve left some lads disappointed at being omitted, but that’s what GAA management is all about right?

Making those hard decisions!

Before we start, you might like to check out our Ultimate Guide to Gaelic Football Positions Blog?

Best GAA Players of all Time

1. Goalkeeper: Stephen Cluxton (Dublin GAA)

best gaa players of all time

Without doubt, one of the easiest decisions we had to make.

Cluxton will go down as the greatest GAA goalkeeper of all time, finishing up last year with eight All-Ireland medias to his name, captain for seven of those.

He was the great revolutionary of the goalkeeping position, transforming the requirements and expectations on modern-day goalkeepers to a more quarter-back role.

His kickouts and quick restarts, as well as his dead-ball accuracy, made his one of the most important cogs in the Dublin juggernaut.

Full Back line

best gaa players of all time

2. Right Corner back: Keith Higgins (Mayo GAA)

The former Young Footballer of the Year retired with four All Stars but without that All-Ireland medal he came so close to achieving.

However, the Ballyhaunis GAA man was consistently excellent across two decades and on the biggest stage of them all.

Versatile enough to play anywhere on the pitch if required, Higgins really made his name as a man-marking corner back who could punish teams on the front foot with his electric pace.

3. Full Back: Seamus Moynihan (Kerry GAA)

The Kerry star was a colossus defender, finishing his career with four Celtic Crosses and three All Stars, being considered as one of the greats.

Comfortable at centre back or full back, Moynihan was a complete package – renowned for his marking, football ability, strength, and pace.

Although he retired from inter-county football in 2006 and played much of his football during the 1990s, Moynihan could not be omitted from the team.

4. Left Corner Back: Marc Ó Sé (Kerry GAA)

The youngest of the Ó Sé brothers had some competition here, with Mick Fitzsimons, Philly McMahon and Johnny Cooper all unlucky not to be picked.

But as a former Footballer of the Year and for his out-and-out defensive qualities, the Kerry man gets the nod.

Often underappreciated compared to his brothers, Tomás and Darragh, Marc was consistency personified during the past two decades.

He won his last All-Ireland with Kerry in 2014 before calling it a day two years later.

There never anything too swashbuckling about him, but he did all the basics at the highest of quality and that is crucial.

Half Back line

best gaa players of all time

5. Left Wing Back: Lee Keegan (Mayo GAA)

Mayo’s greatest player of all time, Lee Keegan is also the highest scoring defender of all time with 6-40 in championship football.

The Westport GAA man made his name as an explosive and attack-minded wing back, before adapting to a man marking corner back later in his career.

In Mayo’s biggest days, Keegan has been able to negate the opposition’s best player while also hurting them at the other end.

Footballer of the Year in 2016, there ill never be another Lee Keegan.

Keegan’s former Mayo teammate Eoghan McLaughlin shares his expertise on How to Play Wing Back in the blog. 

6. James McCarthy (Dublin GAA)

A Rolls Royce football, McCarthy was a pivotal figure in Dublin’s six-in-a-row winning team.

Comfortable in midfield and in the half forward line, McCarthy’s best position is in the half back line where his physicality, presence, calmness on the ball and explosiveness make him a huge threat.

A four-time All Star, the Ballymun star is widely and rightly considered as one of the best footballers the game has ever seen.

Karl Lacey of Donegal GAA can feel hard done by, but the competition in the half back line was simply immense.

7. Jack McCaffrey (Dublin GAA)

Watching Jack McCaffrey in full flight is something special and his goal against Kerry in the 2019 All-Ireland Final was him at his best.

Making his championship debut in 2013, McCaffrey won the Footballer of the Year award in 2015 and received a second nomination in 2018.

His electrifying pace destroyed so many teams throughout his years, while his attacking threat and defensive skills improved year-on-year.

One of the greatest wing backs ever.

Midfield

best gaa players of all time

8. Midfield: Brian Fenton (Dublin GAA)

Fenton is midfield and Gaelic football royalty – arguably the greatest midfielder of all time, and we don’t say that lightly.

Genius when in possession and a trojan workrate when in not, Fenton was an inspirational figure for Dublin during their famous campaign playing in every minute of the six-in-a-row.

Amazingly, the Raheny GAA man didn’t lose his first game in a Dublin jersey until 2021 and  to date has five All Stars to his name.

A Footballer of the Year award is coming down the road.

9. Midfield: Darragh Ó Sé (Kerry GAA)

No midfield could be complete without this towering Kerryman.

The second of the Ó Sé brothers to make this team, Darragh was the engine room and midfield dynamo of the great Kerry team during the noughties.

Powerful on the ground and dominant in the air, Ó Sé was also an excellent kickpasser and much of his great play involved supplying quality ball to a dangerous attack.

He retired in 2010 with four All Stars and six All-Ireland titles.

Mayo GAA’s and All Star midfielder Mattie Ruane shares his insight and advice on how to play the postion in this blog.

Half Forward Line

10. Right Half Forward: Diarmuid Connolly (Dublin GAA)

Much maligned at times during his career for various incidents not involving a football, there is no doubting the class of Diarmuid Connolly.

On his day there was few, if any, who could match the sheer level of skill and the effortlessness of how he executed those skills than Connolly.

Many say his return of only two All Stars is an indication of how he was perceived by the public and media due to his discipline issues.

However, you can’t deny his ability.

11. Centre Forward: Ciaran Killkenny (Dublin GAA)

A star touted from an early age, Kilkenny went on to surpass even those expectations.

Tempted to a career in the AFL during his late teens, the Castleknock GAA man opted to throw his hand in with his native county and how that worked out for all parties!

He has been a mainstay in the all-dominant Dubs’ team for his industry in the half forward line and his scoring ability.

Named Player of the Year in 2021, Kilkenny is still only 28 years-old and has many more years ahead of him.

12. Left Half Forward: Séan Cavanagh (Tyrone GAA)

Although not in his most natural position here, it was impossible to leave out Séan Cavanagh from this team.
A box-to-box midfielder in his early years, before adapting as a deadly full forward, Cavanagh inspired his native Tyrone to three All-Ireland titles.

He also captained Ireland at the International Rules Series, Cavanagh was a stylish attacker who won Player of the Year in 2008.

Full Forward Line

13. Right Corner Forward: Colm Cooper (Kerry GAA)

How ‘The Gooch’ never won a Footballer of the Year award is almost unfathomable.

Maybe he was a victim of his own consistent brilliance, of which is evident in winning a ridiculous eight All Star awards and kicking Kerry to five All-Irelands.

The Dr Crokes GAA clubman hit a massive 23-283 in his 85 senior appearances for Kerry.

14. Full Forward: Michael Murphy (Donegal GAA)

Although deployed all over the field throughout his career with Donegal, Murphy’s best position is on the edge of the square.

Without him, Donegal would not have won the All-Ireland title in 2012 and been as consistently competitive as they have been.

His goal against Mayo in the 2012 All-Ireland final was sensational and he has captained Donegal to five Ulster titles.

Donegal’s best ever.

15. Left Corner Forward: Conor McManus (Monaghan)

The last place on the team was the most difficult to pick.

Close runners include the championship’s all time leading scorer Cillian O’Connor, Bernard Brogan, Peter Canavan and Con O’Callaghan, however, it’s hard to look McManus.

Although he never competed in an All-Ireland Final, McManus was a mesmerising forward on his day and, at times, looked unmarkable.

A three-time All Star, shone bright on a team that has been fighting far above their weight during this era and we just couldn’t leave him out.

Conclusion

We know we’ve left some superstars out of our team and some can feel really hard done by.

But the standard was incredible and there’s certainly an alternative XV that could be picked!

Why not tell us yours?

You might like our blog on our Retro GAA Jerseys Best Moments?


What does a Black Card mean in GAA

The black card has been much maligned and changed since it was first introduced into Gaelic football, but what does a black card mean in GAA right now?

It’s as confusing to some as it ever was, and its interpretation can leave a lot to be desired.

In this blog we’ll clarify exactly what does a black card mean in GAA.

If you’re new to GAA and don’t know what it stands for, check out this Blog on what GAA means here. 

When was the Black Card in GAA Introduced?

A black card was brought into football back in 2014 in an attempt to curb cynical fouling, which had crept into football.

Remember Seán Kavanagh/Joe Brolly gate?

what does a black card mean in GAA

Well, that moment is often – unfairly or fairly – scapegoated as the tipping point as to why the rule was introduced.

Initially it was decided that the player receiving the black card would be substituted immediately and not allowed back onto the field.

But that has since been changed to the 10-minute sin bin rule.

What does a black card mean in GAA

To be given a black card in the GAA, a player must leave the field for ten minutes, and no replacement can come on during that period.

Effectively, your team is a man down for ten minutes.

Should a player receive a black card followed by a yellow card later in the match, or vice versa, they will be issued a red card.

The time in the sin bin will start when the referee restarts the game after the foul.

The player can only return to play, after the period of ten minutes has ended, at the next break in play and with the permission of the referee.

If the goalkeeper happens to get a black card he could be replaced by one of the outfield players who should wear a distinctive jersey or a sub made.

A black card will also carry into extra time, as well as the non-expired time of the black card.

Black card offences in the GAA

Cynical Behaviour fouls

  • To deliberately pull down an opponent
  • To deliberately trip an opponent with the hand, arm leg or foot
  • To deliberately collide with an opponent after he has played the ball away or for the purpose of taking him out of the movement of play
  • To remonstrate in an aggressive manner to match officials
  • To threaten or to use abusive or provocative language or gestures to an opponent or teammate

All these fouls are completely up to the discretion of the referee.

Conclusion

We hope we’ve answered what does a black card mean in GAA for you.

Check out this cool video from the GAA below.

You can check out our GAA ranges HERE. 

 

 


Most Memorable National League GAA Moments

To celebrate the start of the 2023 Allianz National League (GAA) in both football and hurling, we’re looking back at some of the most memorable moments throughout the years.

Intersport Elverys is steeped in GAA history and we’ve witnessed some of the best and most exciting moments from teams like Mayo GAA, Dublin GAA and Tipperary GAA to name just a few.

Check out or leading range of county GAA gear right HERE.

Or take a trip down memory lane below.

We’ve got even more quality nostalgic content on our Retro GAA Jerseys Blog – we promise, you’ll enjoy it.

2019 National League: Mayo end Croke Park silverware hiatus

Mayo 3-11 Kerry 2-10

The Green and Red blasting out from the Croke Park speakers shortly after Mayo defeated Kerry in the 2019 National League Final signalled a real release of emotion.

Time and time again Mayo had suffered heartbreak at GAA HQ, many times at the hands of their Kerry opponents, since their last victory in 2001.

The outpouring of emotion by players and supporters showed how much this meant for Mayo GAA.

James Horan’s men were deserved winners, but as they so often did in the past, did things the difficult way, relying on a brilliant injury time save by Robbie Hennelly to keep them in the game.

Ballina’s Ciaran Treacy then goaled in the third minute of injury time to put the game to bed.

Mayo trailed by 2-3 to 0-5 at half time, but big displays from James Carr and Diarmuid O’Connor, before goals from Mattie Ruane and O’Connor, helped Mayo to a famous win.

Shop Mayo GAA HERE.

national league gaa

2011 National League: Dublin GAA’s long wait ended

Dublin 0-22 Kilkenny 1-7

With the Dublin hurling revolution in full steam, they stormed Croke Park and ended a 72-year wait for a National League Hurling title with victory over Kilkenny.

It was no mean feat either to beat the Cats in the manner Dublin did – complete dominance!

Croke Park was rocking and the whole country stood up and took notice.

Anthony Daly’s side rattled Kilkenny from the off, and Brian Cody’s side’s chances went from bad to worse when Eoin Larkin got his marching orders for an off-the-ball incident.

The likes of Liam Rushe and Conal Keaney were outstanding, while the cheers roared out as captain John McCaffrey lifted the trophy in the Hogan Stand.

Shop Dublin GAA HERE. 

national league gaa

2003 National League: Cats win all-time classic

Kilkenny 5-14 Tipperary 5-13

Has there been a greater National League Hurling final than the 2003 clash between hurling’s great rivals?

The two best teams in the land put on a spectacle of hurling and recorded the highest aggregate score ever recorded in a National League Hurling final.

Amazingly, there was 6-6 along scored in the final 15 minutes of carnage, with 4-4 of that going in favour of Kilkenny, who came back from eight points down to win.

A second goal from Martin Comerford in the 50th minute sparked the recovery, before Lar Corbett temporarily replied for Tipperary to quinch the glimmer from the Cats.

But then all hell broke loose, with Charlier Carter and DJ Carey combing for a goal, before Carter hit Kilkenny’s first and then the dazzling Eddie Brennan rifled home the fifth to give them a 5-12 to 4-13 lead.

Tipp’s John Carroll then restored his side’s lead with his second goal of the game.

But cometh the hour, cometh the man and that was Henry Shefflin.

He levelled the game with a free in the 69th minute before kicking over the winning point in injury time after a dazzling run.

Phew!

Shop Tipperary GAA or Kilkenny GAA here.

national league gaa

1991 National League: Offaly cross final frontier

Offaly 2-6 Wexford 0-10

1991 was the year in which Offaly cemented their status in hurling’s hall of fame.

Never before had they captured a National League title in Croke, despite their success throughout the 1980s.

In beating a dogged Wexford, the young Offaly team, of which nine starters were under the age of 25, Padraig Horan’s side were determination personified.

Goals either side of half time from Daithi Regan was pivotal, while dual-star star Michael Duignan had an outstanding 35 minutes, despite being marked by the highly rated Liam Dunne.

But the likes of Johnny Pilkington and Niall McDonald stood up when needed in the second half to fire their county to the promise land.

Shop Offaly GAA right HERE. 

national league gaa

2009-2012 National League: Rebels go on the rampage

The year 2009 marked a four-year National League winning streak for the Cork GAA footballers with a 1-14 to 0-12 win over Monaghan in the Division 2 Final.

From there, the Cork GAA footballers would complete a historic three-in-a-row of National League Division 1 titles.

At the time it was considering a marvellous achievement, compared to the days of Micko’s dominating tenure with the Kerry team in the 70s in one way.

What made the achievement even more impressive was that they did it without the wider support of the Cork GAA public, who showed little appetite for football and barely travelled to Croke Park.

In 2010, Cork defeated Mayo 1-17 to 0-12 with starring performances from Daniel Goulding and Donncha O’Connor.

The year after, they came from seven points down midway through the second half to defeat Dublin by 0-21 to 2-14, thanks to a late point from Ciaran Sheeran.

In 2012, Mayo again were the victims, with Cork running out 2-10 to 0-11 victors and looking like a real tour-de-force.

Shop Cork GAA right HERE. 

national league gaa

 

2017  National League: Kerry end Dublin’s reign

Kerry 0-20 Dublin 1-16

Jim Gavin’s Dublin team were in the midst of their juggernaut when Kerry spoiled their four-year reign as Division 1 National Football League champions.

In a pulsating encounter, Dean Rock saw a late free strike the post to send the game to extra as the Kerry GAA claimed their first national league title since 2009.

The game had it’s fair share of controversy, with referee Paddy Neilan flashing black cards to Dublin’s Diarmuid Connolly, and Kerry’s Anthony Maher and Johnathan Lyne.

However, late points from midfield duo David Moran and Brian Sheehan helped Kerry over the line by the narrowest of margins.

The Kingdom will also thank the outstanding Paul Geaney, who hit 0-8 (4f) on the day for their win.

Shop Kerry GAA right HERE. 

national league gaa

Conclusion

We hope you enjoyed this National League GAA most memorable moments.

Make sure to let us know what your favourite moments from the National League are.

If you’re a complete newbie to the GAA, our Ultimate Guide to Gaelic Football Positions Blog might help you out.


A Starters Guide to Gaelic Football Positions

GAELIC football positions have evolved massively over the years.

The days of 15 players taking to the field and matching up with their opposing 15 for the entire game are long gone. Thirty years ago, if a corner back wandered up to the corner forward position he’d have got the curly finger and pulled straight off.

In the modern game, it’s now a prerequisite for corner backs to try and cover every blade of grass on the pitch.

Before we start, check out the graphic below for a quick refresh on the 15 positions on a Gaelic football team.

Gaelic football positions

Now that we know the modern day Gaelic football positions, lets get into what skills are required to play them and the players who are making them their own at the top level.

Are you ready?

If not, and you want more GAA content, our Best National League moments is available to read right HERE. 

Gaelic football positions: Goalkeeper (#1)

In a different era, the goalkeeper was a much simpler role.

You stood in goal and tried to stop goal-bound shots, while every kickout you had went long down the middle to the midfielders.

However, that manual has been torn up and republished, mainly thanks to Dublin GAA legend Stephen Cluxton.

gaelic football positions

After establishing himself as Dublin’s number one in 2001, Cluxton perfected the art of the short kickout and quick restart, with an ability to land the ball on a sixpence to his teammates.

But that’s not all.

Cluxton can also be a place kicker and score points (remember the 2011 All-Ireland Final?), has incredible reflexes which makes him a top-class shot stopper, is comfortable on the ball to take it out the field to create an overlap, as well as being a brilliant communicator to organise his team.

These days you have goalies like Monaghan’s Rory Beggan, Tyrone’s Niall Morgan and Donegal’s Shaun Patten who have all those aforementioned qualities and can basically play as an extra outfielder.
So really, a goalkeeper is an all-round style player.

Gaelic Football Positions: Corner back (#2 & #4)

The number one objective for any corner back is to mark the opposition team’s most threatening scorer.

A modern day corner back needs quick feet to keep with the usually fast-paced corner forward, upper body strength to be able to hold up the forward and dispossess the ball in the tackle, and discipline to avoid coughing up soft frees.

But of course, they’re now also expected to attack from the back and make long, lung-bursting runs up the field, breaking the opposition defensive line and chipping in on the scoreboard or setting up scores.

Gaelic Football positions

Donegal’s Eoghan Bán Gallagher and Galway’s Liam Silke are your typical attack-minded corner backs who regularly contribute to the scoreboard, while Dublin’s Mick Fitzsimons and Mayo’s Lee Keegan are renowned for their man-marking ability.

Gaelic Football Positions: Full Back (#3)

Donegal’s Neil McGee and former Dublin star Rory O’Carroll possessed the strength, power, marking ability and no-nonsense style that very regularly sees them hailed as the best full backs in the last decade.

Their main job was to protect the goal, snuff out attacks and be a big physical presence. They were never too bothered about galloping up the field to support the play. Cavan’s Pádraig Faulker is cut from the same cloth.

But depending on the team’s style of football, full backs are often expected to attack from deep. Young Footballer of the Year and Mayo’s Oísin Mullin, as well as Dublin’s Davy Byrne, are those type of all-action full backs who love to get up the field and don’t possess the same physical size as a Neil McGee for example.

Gaelic football positions

Gaelic Football Positions: Wing Back (#5 & #7)

First of all, a high base of aerobic stamina is needed for this role. Inter-county wing backs can cover more than 10km during a game and nearly 2000m in sprint distances.

Wing backs needed to be versatile players who have pace to break lines and start attacks, good footballers to play those 40/50+ yard passes into the forwards, aggressive and disciplined to be winning breaking ball and making tackles, while an eye for the posts also helps.

Modern day wing backs like Donegal’s Ryan McHugh, Mayo’s Paddy Durcan, Dublin’s former Footballer of the Year Jack McCaffrey, Kerry’s Paul Murphy or Meath’s Donal Keogan are among the best out there right now.

Don’t miss Mayo GAA star Eoghan McLaughlin sharing his tips and advice on How to Play Half Back in this blog. 

Gaelic football positions

Gaelic Football Positions: Centre Back (#6)

The centre back is clamp that holds the back line together. They’ll need all the skills of the wing back, but have to be more disciplined about sitting and holding the middle channel.

It can be the enforcer type role and the player needs to have a high football IQ to sniff out attacks before they come to fruition, while a touch of abrasiveness also helps.

Arguably, the importance of the old-school centre back has evolved to being more of a free role in the modern game, but guys like John Small of Dublin, Colm Boyle of Mayo, Derry’s Gareth McKinless and Peter Harte of Tyrone all have the traditional centre back style about them.

Gaelic football positions

Gaelic Football Positions: Midfield (#8 & #9)

The engine room of the team – Midfielders are one of the most vital cogs in the wheel in terms of Gaelic football positions.

It wouldn’t be unusual to see them cover close to 12km in a single game, so they need to have incredible stamina. Plus, they’ll be required to win kickouts, link ball from defence to attack, defend and to get scores.

Dublin’s Brian Fenton is quite possibly one of the best midfielders to ever play the game, while his teammate James McCarthy isn’t too far off. Kildare’s Kevin Feely and Kerry’s David Moran are also complete footballers.

Those aforementioned guys are tall, athletic and powerful men.

gaelic football positions

Gaelic Football Positions: Wing Forward (#10 & #12)

Arguably the toughest position to play on the pitch due to the work rate required.

A wing forward is expected to do the defensive work of a wing back, but the attacking work of a midfielder and corner forward. Often they’ll find themselves covering ground and not getting on much ball, so patience is required to play the position well.

They need to be able to anticipate the breaking ball on kickouts, provide width on the attack and deliver high-quality passes to the inside line.

Dublin’s Nially Scully, Mayo’s Kevin McLoughlin, former Kerry star Paul Galvin, Roscommon’s Enda Smith and Cork’s Ruairi Deane are all dynamic ball carriers that can run all day.

gaelic football positions

 

Gaelic Football Positions: Centre Forward (#11)

The artist of the team – usually highly skilled, boasts a big engine and a natural born leader.

A centre forward needs vision, ability to scrap for breaking ball, can tackle, score and play pinpoint passes into the full forward line.

Often the most complete footballer on the team.

Kerry’s Seán O’Shea and Dublin’s Ciarán Kilkenny are the country’s best. Aidan O’Shea has enjoyed time their for Mayo, while Galway’s Shane Walsh can be unstoppable on his day. All those guys are supreme athletes, genius footballers and possess the ‘X Factor’.

gaelic football positions

Gaelic Football Positions: The Full Forward line (#13, #14 & #15)

Their main job is to put scores on the board, so an eye for the posts is the single most important factor for a good corner forward.

Most likely, they’ll also be the free taker – a massively responsible role that requires skill and concentration in abundance.

Pace and quick feet are a huge advantage in creating space and keeping away from the claws of a corner back, while good hands ensure an ability to win ball out in front.

Patience is another important attribute because often times the full forward line can be starved of ball, so being able to stay calm and make use of limited possession is crucial.

Some of the best include Cillian O’Connor, Dean Rock, Paddy McBrearty and Michael Murphy of Donegal, Conor McManus of Monaghan and the great David Clifford from Kerry to name a few.

gaelic football positions

That’s not to forget Daniel Flynn from Kildare, Paul Geaney, Shane McGuigan, Tyrone duo Conor McKenna and Cathal McShane and Armagh’s Riain O’Neill.

Conclusion

We hope this guide will help you find your best position on a Gaelic football team. And if you think we’ve left any player out who deserves a mention – no doubt we have – then let us know in the comments.

Otherwise, get out there and get practicing!

gaelic football positions

 


The Quarters: It’s All to Play For

It’s that time of year again. The football quarter finals in Croker. No more second chances!

At Intersport Elverys, we’re extremely proud to be the official retail partner of three out of the four teams looking to book their place in the Semis – Mayo, Galway and Kerry GAA. The latter two go head-to-head in the earlier game with the former facing off against neighbours and rivals Roscommon in the 4pm game. Suffice to say, it’s been a thrilling road up to this point for our partner counties and we can expect nothing less this weekend.

The Route

Mayo have endured possibly their most difficult championship in recent years yet have managed to stay afloat. Losing to Galway in the Connacht semi final meant they would have to play three qualifier games to progress to the All-Ireland series.

Galway fell short in the Connacht decider against a strong Roscommon side and lost out on their chance to win back-to-back Connacht titles. They faced the same fate as Mayo and had to play a qualifier against Donegal. The Tribesmen’s heads weren’t down for long as they throttled Donegal in their qualifier game in Sligo.

Kerry were able to navigate their way into the quarters after an impressive performance against Cork in the Munster final, taking home their fifth consecutive Munster title.

 

As retail partner to these teams in action this Sunday, it’s great to see their passion and dedication to the game translate into winning momentum.

At Intersport Elverys, we are delighted to be their destination for boots, supplying them with the latest and greatest styles to suit their play. We understand that having the right footwear is an important part of any GAA player’s game as they strive for greatness on the field.

This year Intersport Elvery’s passion for GAA is reflected in the fact that we are now proud retail partners of TEN GAA inter-county teams. We are THE destination for all things GAA.

Click below to shop our HUGE range of GAA boots.